CLICK HERE for a printable sheet metal word find for kids - note, it looks better printed than on screen!
SHEET METAL WORKER
The summer of 1982, as a third year apprentice, I spent a lot of my time doing this. An added attraction going on down in the Capitol Building were people rallying either for or against the Equal Rights Amendment.
The other fella in this picture is Carl Stowe, a good buddy of mine who is, unfortunately, no longer with us.
Carl was coaching and helping me find my "dome" legs in this picture. Believe it or not, you are safer up there (with 4 safety ropes) than you are walking down the street!
What a view you had from up there. I even went up to the flag pole, which is 409 feet off the ground.

The patching we did on the dome was from weathering that occurs naturally, AND we also patched bullet holes.
Another view of the view!
Several years after the dome work, we were back up in the lower gutters replacing the metal there with Tro-cal,a rubber coated metal.  Ironically, we'd be back again in 1998 replacing it and all the lower roofs.
A closer look at the work
When the sheet metal workers were done laying down metal, the roofers would come along behind and seal it.
~~~Summer of 1998~~~
REROOFING  THE LOWER ROOFS
SOME OF THE MEMBERS OF LOCAL 218-S WHO TOOK PART IN THIS PROJECT.  IT WAS QUITE EXTENSIVE, AS WE TOOK THE ROOF ALL THE WAY DOWN TO THE CONCRETE, THEN BUILT IT BACK UP. 
Members of the crew, left to right: Larry Gabriel, Steve Portwood, Steve Jones, Jeff D'Angelo, Rich Fainter (kneeling), Ed Bowen, Kevin Hayes, Beth
A more complete crew here (some would come in and help on Saturdays after they'd been someplace else during the week.)

Left to right front row: Rich Fainter
2nd row: Larry Gabriel, Beth, Steve Jones, John Goodwin
3rd row: Chris Reid, Dan Sunley, Jeff D'Angelo, Frank Conway
Back row: Ed Bowen, Kevin Hayes, Jim Killion
This is the scaffold we climbed every day to get to work.  On all the jobs before this one, we were "allowed" to use the elevators and climb out onto the roof via the attics.  It was a little tough toward the end of the job when they got rid of the porta-potties from the roof!
Yours truly at the 4-ft. brake.  On jobs of this nature, each piece of metal often has to be measured and fabricated on the job.
There was a lot of work to do here!  We started the week before Memorial Day, and some of the guys were still soldering well into October.
Another view of the roof.  The pieces of metal stacked to the left in the picture were made in the shop.

And look!  The Business Agent is here checking things out - Paul Hayes, the guy w/the sunglasses on the right, talking to Rich Fainter
Here is the finished product.  The picture on the right really shows the difference between old and new metal.  Several years later, the same contractor went back and did the entire rest of the roof.  I declined the offer, since I'd been in and on that building four times already, during times when you could fry an egg on the roof and, conversely, when you had to shovel snow out of the way to get to your work!  I just figured that, after 4 times, it was some young kid's turn!  (since I can now be classified as one of those infamous "old timers"!!)
As time permits, I'll be adding pictures to these pages, so check back occasionally!  Thanks for stopping by, and have a good day!


CLICK HERE for a printable sheet metal word find for kids - note, it looks better printed than on screen!
OTHER CONSTRUCTION                     LINKS
    (WILL BE ADDING MORE FROM TIME TO TIME)